New monitoring option for rare eye disease

An estimated five to ten percent of blindness worldwide is due to the rare inflammatory eye disease uveitis. Intermediate uveitis is often associated with a chronic course of the disease and the need for immunosuppressive therapy. Intermediate uveitis primarily causes inflammation of the vitreous body, but blood flow to the retina can also be restricted. Researchers at the Eye Clinic of the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) and the University of Bonn have tested optical coherence tomography angiography as a new imaging monitoring method. The blood flow in the retinal vessels is associated with the severity of inflammation and allows conclusions to be drawn about the future course of the disease. Accordingly, this method could be used to monitor the disease and identify patients at risk of a future worsening of the disease. The results have now been published in Nature Scientific Reports.
 
 

Paper of the Quarter: A New Offer by the 3R Competence Network NRW

To make your research in and with 3R methods more widely known and highly visible to the scientific community, you can now apply for the new "Paper of the Quarter".

Main regulator for the body`s oven discovered

Brown fat cells convert energy into heat – a key to eliminating unwanted fat deposits. In addition, they also protect against cardiovascular diseases. Researchers from the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) and the Transdisciplinary Research Area "Life & Health" at the University of Bonn have now identified the protein EPAC1 as a new pharmacological target to increase brown fat mass and activity. The long-term aim is to find medicines that support weight loss. The results of the study have now been published in the renowned journal "Nature Cell Biology".

How does a molecular freight elevator work?

Some bacterial membrane transporters work almost like freight elevators to transport substances through the cell membrane into the interior of the cell. The transporter itself spans the bacterial membrane. Like a forklift, a soluble protein outside the bacterium transports the substance to the "elevator" and unloads its cargo there. The freight elevator transports it to the inside of the cell, in other words to another floor. Researchers at the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) and the University of Bonn, in collaboration with a team from the University of York, have now studied the interaction between the transporter and its soluble substrate binding protein. Interestingly, they adapt precisely to each other during the transportation process. As this happens very quickly, the researchers virtually "blocked" the elevator by specifically inserting anchors, so-called disulphide bridges. This enabled them to prove that only the loaded "forklift" fits the "elevator" if it is on the right floor. This makes transportation really effective. The study has now been published in the journal "Nature Communications".

Languages, taxes and restaurants - wide range of topics at the ideas pitch

The 2023 Ideas Competition organized by the Transfer Center enaCom once again impressively demonstrated the innovative potential of the University of Bonn. Eight candidates made it through to the final on December 6 and pitched their ideas to the jury and audience at the Digitalhub at Bonn's central station. Three of them convinced the distinguished jury: "UniTalks" by Daria Kononenko and "Inspired by Learning" by Fabian Mantsch and Lars Pfleider each won 1,000 euros donated by the Universitätsstiftung Bonn and Comma Soft AG. The idea "PlateProfit" by Leon Schmidt won the Digital Startup Prize from DIGITALHUB.DE.
 
 

Partnerships in Australia Strengthened for the Long Term

A delegation from the University of Bonn has visited Australia with three main aims in mind: to cultivate partnerships, strengthen exchange programs and explore options for joint research. Existing cooperation arrangements were stepped up on the trip and new ones agreed for the future.
 
 

Malfunction in spermatogenesis

For successful fertilization, sperm should move forward rapidly and be shaped correctly. The unique structure of the sperm cells forms during spermiogenesis. Now, researchers from the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) and the Transdisciplinary Research Unit "Life & Health" at the University of Bonn have found that fertility problems in both mice and humans can be caused by loss of so-called cylicines. This causes defects in head and tail structure of sperm. The results of the study have now been published in the scientific journal "eLife".

New therapeutic approach for prurigo nodularis

Dermatologist Prof. Jörg Wenzel of Bonn University Hospital and University of Bonn has collaborated with Incyte, a U.S.-based global biopharmaceutical company, to develop a strategy for treating patients with severe pruritus (prurigo nodularis) with ruxolitinib cream. The University of Bonn and Incyte have now entered into an agreement whereby Incyte has acquired the rights to a related joint patent application from Bonn.

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